2 Dry Quarts 1/4 inch Horticultural Charcoal

$16.10

 

1/4 Inch Horticultural Charcoal is a soil ingredient with amazing CEC properties. 5-10 percent of most fast draining potting soils should can charcoal.

Horticultural charcoal is a trusted soil amendment for many bonsai and succulent growers. Charcoal has an amazing ability to absorb moisture / nutrients and release them slowly over time. It has a pH of 7.7 and can be used to reduce acidity in your potting mix. It's a lightweight and chunky ingredient that which improves drainage and aeration. No more than 10 percent of your soil mix should contain charcoal. A little goes a long way.

Bonsai Jack bonsai charcoal is free of chemicals and additives that are often found in store bought cooking charcoal. Screened to 1/4 of an inch before shipping.

Did you know?
All of our soil products are state inspected and tested on a regular basis in order to comply with multi-state regulations.
This ensures you receive material free of dangerous pathogens that can damage or kill plants. This is also required to maintain six nursery stamps that allow us to ship to all 50 states.

 

Click the Additional Information tab for more details.

 

SKU: 799600830185 Category:

Additional information

Weight 2 lbs
Dimensions 6 × 8 × 4 in
Color

Black

Country of Origin(COO)

United States

Average Particle Size

1/4 Inch

Minimum Particle Size

1/8th Inch

Maximum Particle Size

3/8ths Inch

Raw Material

Fired Oak and Hickory.

Quarts

2, Dry

Cubic Inches

134

Cubic Feet

.07

Packaging

2 Quart Bag

Plant Type

Soil Conditioner

Additives

Dye-free. Chemical free

Bulk Density

.137 ounces per cubic inch

pH

7.7

Conversations ...

  1. Phil

    Hi Jack,

    I wasn’t trying to pin you down on specific numbers for my personal custom mixes, but just trying to get a better feel for how to play with charcoal. Your description is pretty clear, charcoal shouldn’t be more than 10% of a mix, and it can be used to raise the pH. I figure you have good reasons to mention those, and I trust your judgement and experience.

    The descriptions of Bonsai Block, lava, and pumice don’t say anything about using those to raise mix pH, so I thought you might have seen charcoal having a greater effect somehow.

    Is 10% a recommended upper limit because of water holding, or maybe nutrient lock-up?

    Having a hard time finding info elsewhere I’d consider reliable.

    Thank you.

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    • Bonsai Jack

      Thanks for the reply Phil. My personal opinion on charcoal for pH adjustment is the same result can be achieved with a little or a lot. Charcoal will also break down quickly. The other factor are proven specimens. I have yet to see a quality tree planted with more than 10 percent charcoal. This includes my plants. I only have one plant using charcoal and that is a Japanese red pine growing wildly in zone 10. My best advice is to seek out the finest nursery in your area growing your plant material. Ask about the soil. A local proven mix for your plant is better than trying to purchase or develop one. Again, this is my opinion. You are welcome to try any combination you choose. You may find something new to offer the bonsai community.

      I hope this helps

      Thanks
      Jack

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  2. Phil

    Why is it recommended that no more than 10% of a media mix should be charcoal?

    Is the effect of charcoal (pH 7.7) on media pH greater than that of lava rock (pH 9.2), and Bonsai Block (pH 8.9)?

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    • Bonsai Jack

      Hello again Phil. Charcoal is fine addition to soil but not as a main substrate. This is why we don’t see plants growing in straight charcoal. You asked about the effect of charcoal and acidity. It really depends on the mix. In our testing we found that a lot of charcoal will have nearly the same result as a little charcoal. It did not have the same reaction as other components. This is a broad generalization based on our hundreds of tests. I wish we had answers for every possible soil combination. The best advice I can give is to seek out the finest specimen trees in your zone and ask what they are using.

      Have a great week
      Thanks
      Jack

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